Sunday, 28 June 2020

Warspot Article: Study of the T-34-85 in the Korean War

Even though the US managed to obtain two T-34 tanks during WWII, they missed their chance to get a T-34-85. This was remedied during the Korean War. Even though the tank that was recovered was incomplete, it allowed the Americans to learn a lot about Soviet tank development. POW interrogations filled in the gaps on the tank's performance in battle.



4 comments:

  1. "The stock ammunition loadout consisted of 55 rounds: 30 anti-personnel, 20 HE, and only 5 AP"- what do they mean distinguishing anti personnel vs HE?

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    1. Maybe "anti personnel" projectile that's fragmentation projectile? IIRC, in Soviet terminology, if 15-20% weight of projectile that's HE material, in this case we have "High Explosive-Fragmentation" projectile. If 20-30% of projectile that's HE material, in this case we have "High Explosive" projectile. If below 15% of projectile that's HE material, in this case we have fragmentation projectile. Of course, I include only HE-style ammo.

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  2. It would have been interesting to read accounts of T-34/85s knocking out Pershings and Pattons.

    Most of the accounts I read of Korean actions were written by the Allies, such as a two-sentence account of a battle between a Centurion and a T-34/85 in which the Centurion absorbed 'several frantic hits' from the T-34 before "dismantling it with one shot". It appears the exchanges weren't always so one-sided.

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    1. Ran into mentions of a few cases while Wiki Walking on that war the other day, ambush flank shots pretty much if memory serves. Probably didn't really help that by the time the Americans actually started getting proper combat tanks (ie. something bigger than Chaffees) onto the scene the NK fleet was already largely gone from campaign attrition and bad logistics.

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